• Routes: Imagining the Road and Walking on It

    Based on a forthcoming book from University of California Press, Stewart Gordon discussed the physical and mental aspects of some of the great routes of human history, which were conduits for ideas, both written and oral, religions, art, technological innovation, magic and cuisine. On those routes traveled slaves, brides, armies, traders, and pilgrims. Central to […]

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  • Thinking Fanon: Fifty Years Later

    African Studies Workshop (ASW) hosted a discussion with Nigel Gibson. Nigel C. Gibson was appointed director of the Honors Program in 2003. He was previously the assistant director of the Institute of African Studies at Columbia University where he received an MA (1989), MPhil (1992), and PhD in political science (1996) as well as an MA in […]

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  • Latin Lessons: How South America Stopped Listening to the U.S. and Started Prospering

    Thanks to demand from big emerging economies, most South American governments have become increasingly “resource nationalistic” and have ramped up social spending to meet the needs of the poor and the indigenous, causing poverty levels to drop – at the same time as poverty has been on the increase in the United States. Will the […]

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  • Digitizing the Diaspora: An Introduction to the South Asian American Digital Archive (SAADA)

    The South Asian American Digital Archive (SAADA) is a Chicago-based non-profit organization that documents, preserves and provides access to the history of the South Asian American community through a digital archive, available online at http://www.saadigitalarchive.org SAADA includes over 350 unique items that reflect the vast range of experiences of the South Asian diaspora in the U.S., including those […]

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  • Cities on Speed: Global Visions for an Urban Future

    Soon more than 550 cities world wide will have a population of more than one million. In 2030 eighty percent of the world’s population will live in cities. Megacities have traditionally been economic and political power centers but today the fastest growing cities are in developing nations. The new challenge is that cities are growing […]

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  • Post-Conflict Challenges Facing Iraqi Children and Teens

    Nearly one half of the Iraqi population is under the age of nineteen.  Having lived with insecurity and uncertainty for much of their lives with little opportunity for travel outside of their home town, these youth often associate more with their local communities than with a national Iraqi identity.  In order for Iraq to build […]

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  • The Future of the Eurozone: The European Project at a Crossroads

    Thomas Schnöll discussed the ramification of the current debt crises for the future not only of the eurozone, but also of the European integration process as a whole. The weeks and months ahead are crucial for the stability of the common currency. What is needed to rebuild trust and confidence? Do European leaders have the […]

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  • All the Missing Souls: A Personal History of the War Crimes Tribunals

    As senior adviser to Madeleine Albright and then as President Clinton’s ambassador-at-large for war crimes issues, David Scheffer was at the forefront of the efforts that led to criminal tribunals for the Balkans, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, and Cambodia, and that resulted in the creation of the permanent International Criminal Court. All the Missing Souls: A Personal […]

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  • Climate Refugees – Film Screening & Discussion

    In 2006, filmmaker Michael Nash learned that a U.N. University study found that there are more environmental refugees in the world than political or religious. With that in mind, Nash set out to document how humans worldwide are being displaced by environmental change and increasingly extreme weather conditions. Through personal accounts and jarring footage, Climate […]

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  • Consuming the Congo: War and Conflict Minerals in the World’s Deadliest Place

    In the eastern Congo, more than five million Congolese have died since 1998—the worst loss of life since World War II. The region, home to minerals integral to electronics like smartphones and laptops, is mined by desperate Congolese under conditions of war and staggering human rights violations. These “conflict minerals”—including coltan and tin—fuel the existing […]

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