• Ghosts of Amistad – Film Screening and Q&A with Marcus Rediker

    This documentary by Tony Buba is based on Marcus Rediker’s The Amistad Rebellion: An Atlantic Odyssey of Slavery and Freedom (Viking-Penguin, 2012). It chronicles a trip to Sierra Leone in 2013 to visit the home villages of the people who seized the slave schooner Amistad in 1839, to interview elders about local memory of the case, and […]

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  • The Challenge of Inequality in Mexico

    atin America is the most unequal region in the world. Despite a decade of economic growth and poverty reduction efforts, inequality still afflicts the largest economies of the region such as Mexico. Between the 1950s and 1980s, Mexico’s GDP grew at an average rate of 6.5 percent in what became known as the “Mexican Miracle”. […]

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  • Greeting the Dead: Managing Solitary Existence in Japan

    At a moment when the population is declining, marriage and birth rates are down, one-third of people live alone while one-fourth are 65 or older, and reports of “lonely death” (of solitary people whose bodies are discovered days, or weeks, after death) are commonplace, the social ecology of existence is undergoing radical change in 21st century Japan. While long-term […]

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  • Mental Health in the War on Terror: Culture, Science, and Statecraft

    This presentation examines how the War on Terror has generated new forms of mental health knowledge and practice by examining the process of forensic evaluations in the Guantanamo military commissions system. After reviewing theories from medical anthropology and cultural psychiatry on the meaning of detainee symptoms, Neil Aggarwal will show how the Guantanamo forensic system […]

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  • After the Revolution: Youth, Democracy and the Politics of Disappointment in Serbia

    When student activists in Serbia helped topple dictator Slobodan Milosevic on October 5, 2000, they unexpectedly found that the post-revolutionary period brought even greater problems. How do you actually live and practice democracy in the wake of war and the shadow of a recent revolution? How do young Serbians attempt to translate the energy and […]

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  • Renegade Dreams: Living Through Injury in Gangland Chicago

    Every morning Chicagoans wake up to the same stark headlines that read like some macabre score: “13 shot, 4 dead overnight across the city,” and nearly every morning the same elision occurs: what of the nine other victims? As with war, much of our focus on inner-city violence is on the death toll, but the […]

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  • India’s Organic Farming Revolution: What It Means for Our Global Food System

    Should you buy organic food? Is it just a status symbol, or is it really better for us? Is it really better for the environment? What about organic produce grown thousands of miles from our kitchens, or on massive corporately owned farms? Is “local” or “small-scale” better, even if it’s not organic? A lot of […]

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  • The Creation of Hard and Soft Currencies: Historical Roots of Present Inequalities in Africa

    Toby Green is a lecturer in Lusophone African History and Culture at Kings College in London. He has given seminars and contributed to symposia at various institutions in Brazil, France, Portugal, Senegal, The Gambia, The Netherlands, the UK and the USA. Green is the Director of Institutional Relations of the Amilcar Cabral Institute of Economic and […]

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  • Eastern Communism and the Politics of the Global South

    India’s election of 2014 sent the BJP, the Hindu Right, to victory with 30% of the votes. More broadly, however, the majority of parties across the political spectrum in India— including the socialists — have moved to an accommodation with neo-liberalism. Only the Communists (and the Maoists) remain outside that consensus, resulting in a tough task […]

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  • Meeting China’s Environmental Crisis: Religion’s Unlikely Role

    Religion, the subject of official repression throughout much of China’s Communist era, is now experiencing rapid growth. More surprising still, Chinese government officials are invoking Confucianism, Daoism and other cultural traditions as part of the “ecological civilization” required to meet the country’s huge environmental challenges. CIS joined the Pulitzer Center for an exploration the impact of these trends […]

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