Lower Carbon = Higher Profit

kammen

A Forbes Magazine account of Daniel Kammen’s talk in the Center for International Studies’ “Global Inequalities” Speaker Series on April 13, 2015 See the full story at: http://www.forbes.com/sites/jeffmcmahon/2015/04/16/lower-carbon-higher-profit/ Carbon emissions signal inefficiency in a system, an energy expert said in Chicago this week, so reducing emissions usually means increasing savings. “In household after household and […]

A Forbes Magazine account of Daniel Kammen’s talk in the Center for International Studies’ “Global Inequalities” Speaker Series on April 13, 2015

See the full story at:
http://www.forbes.com/sites/jeffmcmahon/2015/04/16/lower-carbon-higher-profit/

Carbon emissions signal inefficiency in a system, an energy expert said in Chicago this week, so reducing emissions usually means increasing savings.

“In household after household and small businesses and schools, we’ve consistently found that carbon- or water-saving operations are good for the bottom line,” Daniel Kammen, a professor of energy at the University of California Berkeley, told about 150 people at the University of Chicago’s Oriental Institute on Monday.

Kammen is backed up, in part, by a study he published in 2011 in the Journal of Environmental Science and Technology. Kammen and co-author Chris Jones found that a 20 percent reduction in carbon emissions resulted in $2,100 per year in potential financial savings for a household.

“What we found, no surprise, is that actions that save you on carbon almost always save you on money,” Kammen said. “Because after all those emissions are a waste.”

Watch Daniel Kammen’s talk for CIS » 

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